Top 5 Must-See Horror Film Adaptations

Horror stories have captivated audiences for years.  What most likely began as stories around a campfire, has evolved to over 100 years of frightening and formidable films.  If you recall from our post “Top 5 Must-See Sci-Fi Film Adaptations”, Georges Méliès is credited with creating the first science fiction film.

Méliès is recognized as the creator of the first horror film too, Le Manoir du Diable, a three-minute short film (above) made in 1896.  The plot dances through the world of vampires, demons, and skeletons, which was sure to send shivers throughout the terrified audience when it was first released on Christmas Eve, 1896, at the Théâtre Robert-Houdin, in Paris.  On this ‘Friday the 13th’ we want to share with you some of our favorite adapted horror films.  If you have seen these films or have a suggestion for a must-see we may have missed, leave a comment below.

Jaws (1975)

origin_475576450

Did you visit the beach this summer?  You might not want to go back after watching Steven Spielberg’s Jaws.  The film is based on Peter Benchley’s novel, who was inspired by real-life shark attacks.  The story takes place in a fictional town, Amity, and was filmed mostly on-location in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.  The major difference between the book and the movie was Spielberg’s decision to eliminate most of the minor subplots that occur throughout the novel.  When working to adapt the story, Spielberg proposed to “…change the first two acts, basing them on original screenplay material, while remaining true to the book for the last third of the film,” because that was his favorite part of the book.

John Williams composed the iconic Jaws theme, which received an Academy Award for Best Original Score.  Interestingly enough, the music that is so well-known today, was laughed at by Steven Spielberg himself, thinking it was a joke that only two notes would sound menacing enough for a shark.  If you’re brave enough to DIVE into this one, don’t expect to see the shark right off the bat.  Similar to Alfred Hitchcock’s method, Spielberg suggests a more impending presence.  And if you ask me, that’s what makes this book/movie a thriller!

The Exorcist (1973)

origin_8458054928

In the world of horror stories, The Exorcist is one of the most frightening because it was loosely based on true, demonic events.  William Peter Blatty published this novel in 1971, but the inspiration is rooted in a 1949 exorcism case that Blatty heard about as a student of Georgetown University in 1950.  Without ruining the incredibly thrilling story, the novel revolves around the demonic possession of a girl named Regan MacNeil.

In order to stay true to the story, and live up to its horrific potential, director William Friedkin executed many unorthodox methods during the production of The Exorcist.  Friedkin manipulated his actors to extreme limits, and even caused physical damages to some of the cast members.  The decision was also made to shoot some scenes, specifically the ones at Georgetown University, on-location.  If this story doesn’t sound scary enough, many involved with the production have claimed that the film was cursed.  On several occasions, a priest was even brought in to bless the set.

The Birds (1963)

large_3574893575

Alfred Hitchcock’s film The Birds, was inspired by a novelette of the same name written by Daphne du Maurier.  Although the original story is short, it is absolutely haunting with its detail of birds violently attacking humans for seemingly no reason.  In the film’s adaptation, even more detail is provided, with more instances of attacking birds.  It is widely known that Hitchcock was never a typical Hollywood director.  While filming The Birds, he brought in live birds to unknowingly attack his leading actress, Tippi Hendren.  Despite Hitchcock’s enormous approval of Hendren, she only filmed one more movie under his direction, Marnie.  The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Special Effects, and Tippi Hendren shared the Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year with Ursula Andress and Elke Sommer.

Dracula (1931)

origin_9709594953

If you are looking for sparkling vampires and romance, you’ve come to the wrong place.  In 1897, Bram Stoker first introduced the character Count Dracula.  But, Stoker did not invent the creatures we know as vampires, he simply defined a modern form.  Although there are countless adaptations of this story, Dracula (1931) is one of the most well-known versions.  In order to stay true to the story, the writers studied the Broadway stageplay, and the unauthorized silent film Nosferatu (1922) created by F.W. Murnau.

Although the film was not silent, the director Tod Browning was accustomed to that style and struggled to transition into sound.  Inter-tiles and and a newspaper closeup used in the film, display the silent film techniques that still remained in 1931.  The film did very well at the box office, and even caused movie-goers to faint at the horrors on-screen.  With its success, the movie increased the novel’s popularity, creating an instant-classic.

The Shining (1980)

origin_2172894872

The name Stephen King is synonmous with horror.  The Shining was only King’s third novel published, and it established him as an author in the horror genre.  The story takes place in an isolated hotel in the Colorado Rockies.  Jack Torrance has just accepted the job as winter caretaker of the hotel and moves in with his wife, Wendy, and five year old son, Danny.  The horror begins when Danny’s psychic abilities allows him to view the hotel’s terrifying past.  Soon, a winter storm hits and Jack becomes possessed with the hotel’s evil nature.

The film adaptation, directed and co-written by Stanley Kubrick, did not receive an immediate positive reception.  Later on, the film received better reactions and higher critical ratings.  However, Stephen King has been quoted expressing his distaste with the film, and being the only adaptation of his that he “hated.”  I would recommend enjoying the film and book yourself, and then you can decide who told the story better.

#SupportBooks

photo credits: doobybraintwm1340David Reecepds209Adam Polselli via photopin cc

THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING BOOKS!

“Art of various kinds is often expensive, and filmmaking especially so. Thousands of gifted filmmakers, young and old, have waited hat in hand at the studio gates, only to be turned away with nothing. That’s why Kickstarter and like organizations—which secure funding through donations from people with an interest in art-to-be—are a healthy and adventurous way to go. Let the studios eat cake, as a famous lady once said.” — Larry McMurtry

Thanks to you and the KICKSTARTER community, we have reached our STRETCH GOAL of $12,000 and are now in the position to finish production on BOOKS: A DOCUMENTARY!

Our journey is just beginning and we would LOVE for you to STAY INVOLVED!  Please LIKE us on Facebook, FOLLOW us on Twitter, and SUBSCRIBE to our Blog for all the latest news and updates.

If you missed us here on Kickstarter, you can check out our website BooksMovie.org, for all the details on pre-ordering the film, purchasing merchandise, future screenings etc…

We are thrilled and overwhelmed by all of your support throughout these past two campaigns and sincerely THANK YOU for believing in BOOKS.  We can’t wait to save you a seat at the theatre.

— Mathew & Sara

funded

Larry McMurtry: May the Books Flourish!

Larry wrote a piece for The Daily Beast today and we have it here for you… Enjoy!

“For writer Larry McMurtry, auctioning off part of his vast book collection was bittersweet, but they are off on a new adventure in the hands of new readers. He writes to urge readers to support a film on Kickstarter documenting this remarkable sale.”

Art of various kinds is often expensive, and filmmaking especially so. Thousands of gifted filmmakers, young and old, have waited hat in hand at the studio gates, only to be turned away with nothing.

That’s why Kickstarter and like organizations—which secure funding through donations from people with an interest in art-to-be—are a healthy and adventurous way to go. Let the studios eat cake, as a famous lady once said.

Writing prose, on the other hand, is a solitary endeavor (unless one has a fine writing partner, as do I). And as such, it’s not very expensive. Paper, a typewriter, and a place to write is all I needed; that is, until I was given a laptop computer.

I came to the world of computers at least 20 years late, thus missing whole generations of pods, tablets, and the like, which is too bad. Diana Ossana, my writing partner and close friend, purchased a MacBook for me recently, at my request. I let it sit for six months and then made a cautious approach to the keyboard, as one might approach a wary woman. I respect it greatly, and though I work at it every day, we are not yet on familiar terms. But maybe, if time allows, I’ll improve.

At present, the fledgling artistic project nearest to my heart is a worthy one called “BOOKS, A Documentary,” a film about my own passion for books, a passion that led me to create a book town in my home place of Archer City, Texas.

At its peak, my book town harbored between 500,000 and 600,000 volumes, not counting my own 28,000 volume personal library. I love my books, all of them. Holding them in my hands, leafing through the pages, is a comfort to me. But this is a lot of books: my son and grandson might not be so inclined as to simply sit and appreciate their presence.

So, I held an auction in Archer City over three scorching summer days in August 2012 to reduce the burden of books that might be left to my heirs, should I depart before my inventory does. I managed, during said auction, to launch two-thirds of said inventory back out into the world, all taking up residence with new and enthusiastic owners. The adventures of those books will be documented, should the smart young filmmakers have their way.

It’s been a bittersweet experience for me, parting with my beloved stock, but they’ve been given a second life, on bookshelves and in storefronts all across America.

The filmmakers are my goddaughter Sara Ossana and her husband Mathew Provost. May they–and the books–flourish! — Larry McMurtry

Support Books by becoming a backer –http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/studioseven7films/books-a-documentary-take-2

Screen Shot 2013-09-05 at 1.14.42 PM

What we’re listening to…

The Mighty Good Boys

Mighty Good Boys, Mighty Good Yes!  Not sure if that makes sense, but we’re going with it.

The Might Good Boys can be summed up… like you’re sitting at a picnic table surrounded by your favorite people about to dive into a mound of steamed Chesapeake Bay shellfish.  This combination of talented gents, are similar to a tasty mix of blue crabs, oysters, clams, crawfish, green beans and corn on the cob steamed in a bath of old bay, which will leave you wishing for more, or at least a napkin.

Hailing from Providence, RI, Corey, Travis, Nick, Jeff, Benny and Mike have been delighting crowds with their heavy influence of Appalachian & other American folk music styles.

Looking to plan summer trip?  Try ‘Taking a Train’ out of the city.  Fair warning, you might not want to come back.  Check out The Might Good Boys at reverbnation.com/themightygoodboys

As always, don’t forget to share your favorite songs of the summer on our Facebook Page or on Twitter using the hashtag #SupportBooks.

#SupportBooks
by visiting us on
kickstarter-logo-light

Book Towers

Detroit book towertower-of-babel-book-tower

Stacking books has been a long tradition and necessary tool of those wanting to organize, carry or build.  Build???  Well if you’ve ever spent time in Detroit, you may have looked up to see the Book Tower, a stunning 38-story skyscraper in the Washington Boulevard Historic District.  Unfortunately the tower was not made of books, but rather named after three brothers, J. Burgess, Frank, and Herbert Book determined to turn the Detroit’s Washington Boulevard into the “Fifth Avenue of the West”.

Lucky for us though, in 2011 Buenos Aires was named World Book Capital by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.  What better way to celebrate than build a spiraling tower built with over 30,000 donated books.  Artist Marta Minujin designed the Tower of Babel, as she named it, creating the installation 25-meters high.  Although the shelf life of the tower was only a month, when it was time to take the sculpture down visitors were encouraged to pick out a book and take it home with them.  Now that’s an idea worth building upon.

photo credits: UpNorth Memories – Donald (Don) Harrison & Guillermo Puglia via photopin cc

#SupportBooks
by visiting us on
kickstarter-logo-light

Screening Room: ‘Books: A Documentary’

#SupportBooks
by visiting us on
kickstarter-logo-light

Chris Barsanti

booksdoc

This is the killer Kickstarter pitch for a new proposed film project with the can’t-go-wrong title of Books: A Documentary:

This past August over 300,000 antiquarian books from Larry McMurtry’s Booked Up were sold at auction: This is the story of those Books.

Color us intrigued.

For those not already in awe of the man, Lonesome Dove and Brokeback Mountain author McMurtry also owns one of the nation’s great used-book emporiums. He told the tale of last fall’s great blowout sale at the New York Review of Books.

booksdoc2

According to Publishers Weekly, the filmmakers (husband-and-wife Sara Ossana and Mathew Provost) have already shot about half of the doc and need $50,000 to finish it up. Ossana notes that the film, which uses McMurtry’s sale to explore the modern book landscape, might be expected to be a downbeat tale about an industry and way of life in decline:

View original post 131 more words

The business of imagination

A life long Connecticut resident, Brian Trent, was born in Waterbury CT, once nicknamed ‘Brass-City’ for it’s manufacture of watches and clocks through the first half of the 20th century.  Since his earliest memory, Brian has had a life long fascination with discovering how the world and space ‘tick’.  A passion, he most likely picked up from spending time his family, also science fiction fans.

This past April, Brian Trent was honored by Writers of the Future in Hollywood for his story “War Hero”.  We asked him to write about his experience.

Trent-BlogI had been writing stories since childhood, scribbling adventure tales on stacks of yellow legal pads. For my sixth birthday my parents bought me a typewriter (a metallic blue Brother 11) and my way of thanking them was to incessantly pound out stories late into the night like an over caffeinated drummer. Then I’d mail these stories to prospective magazines; since my penmanship resembles a cross between drunken cuneiform and double-exposed Chinese calligraphy, I can’t be sure how many ultimately reached their destinations.

Flash-forward to 2012. I wrote “War Hero” on my computer, which is quieter than my typewriter and doesn’t jam if I type too fast (although most of the white lettering has long since worn off of the keys; I still type like other people drum.) I mailed the story to the Writers of the Future Contest, one of the most prestigious competitions of the genre, and waited. Half of the struggle in this business is learning to wait.

In December, I get the phone call: “Mr. Trent? I’m calling to let you know that your story has just been selected as a winner in the 29th Annual Writers of the Future Contest.”  Ah! I could finally justify to my parents the many nights I kept them up with the clack-clack-clack of my typewriter!  In April, I was flown out to Hollywood, taken through an exquisite week-long writing workshop, met the luminaries of the field, and got to give an acceptance speech.

I first sat down to write “War Hero” in order to explore an idea:  If minds can be uploaded and downloaded at will, how does that change the face of war?  What if the war criminal you’re tracking can literally be anyone, and you’re never really sure if you’ve eliminated the last copy?  To be sure, mind-uploading is a theme I’ve explored before (Apex Magazine’s latest issue features my story “A Matter of Shape-space” which also tackles this prickly issue) but “War Hero” took the concept and galloped straight into an especially grisly lair of ideas.

Whether grisly or not, ideas are the fuel behind all fiction.  Ideas are what kept my six-year-old self up late at night, hammering out tales of exotic places and possible futures.  Ideas are what books communicate across generations and civilizations, from stone tablet to electronic tablet, from yellow legal pad to whatever we’ll be using tomorrow.  What WILL we be using tomorrow?

Time to explore another idea…

Brian Trent
Read War Hero – Here
#SupportBooks
by visiting
kickstarter-logo-light
—–